Commentary

It is time for federal legalization of cannabis

October 22, 2021 5:00 am
All hail, or inhale, as the case may be

Lack of contemporary cannabis legislation on the federal level has made any form of traditional banking for the industry next to impossible. (Photo by Kym MacKinnon on Unsplash)

With gridlock at the federal level, states have truly become the laboratories of democracy—often leading on legislative policy when Congress is unable. When it comes to cannabis, these laboratories of democracy operate at breakneck speed, with 18 U.S. states legalizing it for both medical and adult “recreational” use and at least some legal use in 37 states and the District of Columbia. In a nation where even a small amount of the substance could and often did (and sometimes still does) lead to serious legal consequences, more than 100 million Americans now live in states with legalized, adult-use cannabis markets. 

Nevada, of course, has been a trailblazer in legalizing cannabis and as a result, has reaped significant  economic and social benefits. When the Legislature established the Cannabis Compliance Board in 2019 with a strong bipartisan majority, Nevada solidified its place as the gold standard for a well-regulated  cannabis industry. In 2021, the Legislature once again demonstrated its ability to create a more equitable  and inclusive cannabis industry, securing a bipartisan 2/3 vote in each legislative chamber to pass a bill establishing cannabis consumption lounges. The lounges, set to open in 2022, will bring new jobs and  enhanced tax revenue that will allow Nevada to invest more in K-12 education. In addition, Nevada’s tens  of millions of tourists will finally have a place to legally consume cannabis. It is clear that Las Vegas is  quickly becoming a global cannabis destination. 

But despite these immense possibilities, state legalization — without change in federal law — still presents serious challenges. For instance, the lack of contemporary cannabis legislation on the federal level has made any form of traditional banking for the industry next to impossible. Cannabis business owners cannot take advantage of favorable tax provisions that help other businesses keep more of the money they make, often leading to additional investment. Even if cannabis is legal in a particular state, carrying that cannabis on to federal property or on to an airplane opens a person to arrest and prosecution by federal authorities.

Furthermore, federal employees or state employees paid through federal funding cannot partake in cannabis, medical or otherwise. Nevadans who live in federally subsidized housing cannot consume in the comfort of their homes, a prohibition that undoubtedly disproportionately impacts vulnerable communities. And business owners in the industry can never feel completely comfortable because the federal government could choose to use its police power to crack down on state level cannabis businesses.  

With polls showing that two-thirds of Americans support legalization of cannabis, it is time for the federal government to legalize it. Such action will pave the way for states that have been hesitant to step out on this issue and will eliminate the current conflicts between federal and state law. Federal legalization will enable  more in-depth study of cannabis by both state and federal agencies to develop a scientific standard of impairment for driving and will enable the federal government to help states with efforts to curb youth cannabis use. 

Nevada has also led the way in pardoning and sealing criminal records for those convicted of low level  cannabis crimes. Those with federal cannabis convictions have no similar remedy, often preventing them from entering the job market at a time when employees have never been in higher demand. Federal cannabis legalization would open the door to cleaning the slate for criminal convictions stemming from conduct the majority of Americans now agree should not have been illegal in the first place. For both moral and economic reasons, erasing records of low level cannabis convictions is simply the right thing to do. For that to happen, cannabis must be legalized on the federal level.

In Nevada, we’ve shown that it is possible to create an equitable and business friendly framework that  benefits both cannabis business owners and consumers. With federal action, we can take this work to the  next level. 

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Steve Yeager
Steve Yeager

Democratic state assemblyman representing District 9 in Clark County, and Speaker Pro Tempore of the Nevada State Assembly

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