Harris says plan will give Nevada teachers a $15,000 raise

president harris
U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris speaks at Canyon Springs High School March 1 during her first presidential campaign visit to Las Vegas. Photo: Michael Lyle
president harris
U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris speaks at Canyon Springs High School March 1 during her first presidential campaign visit to Las Vegas. Photo: Michael Lyle

On the eve of her visit to Reno, presidential candidate Kamala Harris issues a release touting her plan to give teachers a raise.

Her campaign estimates that under her plan the average increase for Nevada teachers would be $15,000.

“In Nevada, nearly 18 percent of teachers work a second job and the average teacher makes roughly $57,400,” reads a Nevada estimate on the Harris campaign website, referencing data from the National Conference of State Legislatures and the National Center for Education Statistics. “That’s about $15,000 less than similar professionals make in the state.”

“Nevada will receive the largest federal investment in teacher pay in history—enough to increase pay for nearly all of Nevada’s 17,335 teachers and entirely close the state’s teacher pay gap,” the campaign says.

The Harris plan also promises extra teacher pay increase in “highest-need schools, which disproportionately serve low-income students.”

The campaign estimates the plan will cost $315 billion nationally, which Harris proposes to fund by “strengthening” the estate tax and “cracking down on loopholes.”

Hugh Jackson
Editor | Hugh Jackson has been writing about Nevada policy and politics for more than 20 years. He was editor of the Las Vegas Business Press, senior editor at the Las Vegas CityLife weekly newspaper, daily political commentator on the Las Vegas NBC affiliate, and wrote the then-groundbreaking Las Vegas Gleaner, which among other things was the only independent political blog from Nevada that was credentialed at the 2008 Democratic National Convention. He spent a few years as a senior energy and environmental policy analyst for Public Citizen, and has occasionally worked as a consultant on mining, taxation, education and other issues for Nevada labor and public interest organizations. His freelance work has been published in outlets ranging from the Guardian to Desert Companion to In These Times to the Oil & Gas Journal. For several years he also taught U.S. History courses at UNLV. Prior to moving to Las Vegas, he was a reporter and then assistant managing editor at the Casper Star-Tribune, Wyoming’s largest newspaper.

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