More divorce, less income and other Nevada notes from new Census report

the one everybody always natters on about
Census Bureau American Community Survey
37.7 if you must know
Population by age and sex in Nevada. U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey.

Compared to the rest of the nation, Nevadans make less money, are more likely to be divorced, less likely to be white, and more likely to own their own homes.

Those are some of points gleaned from the American Community Survey 5-year estimates for 2013-17, which were released by the Census Bureau Thursday. The ACS “is the most relied-on source for up-to-date social, economic, housing, and demographic information every year,” the Bureau said in a statement, which is probably true.

The Bureau has prepared narrative profiles that highlight several categories for the nation and for each state, which make for (relatively) easy comparisons.

Take housing, for instance…

  • Median property value of owner-occupied houses
    • U.S.: $193,500
    • Nevada: $216,400
  • Median monthly housing costs for owners with a mortgage
    • U.S.: $1,515
    • Nevada: $1,422
  • Median gross rent:
    • U.S: $982
    • Nevada: $1,107

Another example: The top five industries that employ the most people in the U.S. compared to the five industries that employ the most employees in Nevada:

U.S. Nevada 
1. Educational services, and health care and social assistance23.1%1. Arts, entertainment and recreation, and accommodation and food services25.3%
2. Retail trade11.4%2. Educational services, and health care and social assistance15.7%
3. Professional, scientific, and management, and administrative and waste management services11.3%3. Retail trade11.9%
4. Manufacturing10.3%4. Professional, scientific, and management, and administrative and waste management services11.1%
5. Finance and insurance, and real estate and rental and leasing9.7%5. Construction6.3%

The percentage of Nevadans who drive to work alone, or take public transportation (78.2 percent and 3.3 percent, respectively), the percentage of people who work in the private vs public sectors (82.8 percent and 11.9 percent, respectively); the median age of Nevadans (37.7); and poverty rates, educational attainment (the one everyone is always nattering on about), internet use — there’s something in the data for everyone.

Oh and for the record, the median household income was $57,653 in the U.S., and $55,434 in Nevada. And in Nevada, 12.8 percent of men and 15 percent of women are divorced, compared to 9.5 percent of men and 12.1 percent of women are divorced nationally, according to the ACS.

Hugh Jackson
Editor | Hugh Jackson has been writing about Nevada policy and politics for more than 20 years. He was editor of the Las Vegas Business Press, senior editor at the Las Vegas CityLife weekly newspaper, daily political commentator on the Las Vegas NBC affiliate, and wrote the then-groundbreaking Las Vegas Gleaner, which among other things was the only independent political blog from Nevada that was credentialed at the 2008 Democratic National Convention. He spent a few years as a senior energy and environmental policy analyst for Public Citizen, and has occasionally worked as a consultant on mining, taxation, education and other issues for Nevada labor and public interest organizations. His freelance work has been published in outlets ranging from the Guardian to Desert Companion to In These Times to the Oil & Gas Journal. For several years he also taught U.S. History courses at UNLV. Prior to moving to Las Vegas, he was a reporter and then assistant managing editor at the Casper Star-Tribune, Wyoming’s largest newspaper.

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