Schools cleared to immediately reopen for in-person summer learning

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apple on deskGov. Steve Sisolak has given Nevada schools the green light to immediately reopen for in-person summer school, according to the Nevada Department of Education.

Under the governor’s new directive, schools are not required to open their buildings for in-person summer school or other activities such as meetings or events. If schools do choose to reopen, they must follow Phase-2 social distancing guidelines. This includes keeping students six feet apart from one another. However, the guidance documents notes there will be exceptions for early childhood education and some students with disabilities.

Many districts and schools previously announced they would offer summer school via distance learning. The press release distributed by the Department of Education on Tuesday states schools can now offer distance learning, in-person classes or some hybrid of the two. However, any in-person learning must be optional or have the ability to be completed through distance learning, according to the state guidance document.

Choir, dancing and physical education are not allowed under the guidance.

As for the upcoming academic year, districts and independent schools must present their reopening plans to their governing body for approval in a public meeting “at least 20 days before the first day of the 2020-2021 school year.” The state’s new summer guidelines may provide some insight into what the upcoming school year will look like — something that schools have been grappling with ever since the coronavirus pandemic began.

Clark County School District’s first day is scheduled for August 10.

April Corbin Girnus
April Corbin Girnus is an award-winning journalist with a decade of media experience. She has been a beat writer at Las Vegas Sun, a staff writer at LEO Weekly, web editor of Las Vegas Weekly and a blogger documenting North American bike share systems’ efforts to increase ridership in underserved communities. An occasional adjunct journalism professor, April steadfastly rejects the notion that journalism is a worthless major. Amid the Great Recession, she earned a B.A. in journalism from the University of Nevada Las Vegas, where she served as editor-in-chief of the student newspaper. She later earned an M.A. in media studies and a graduate certificate in media management from The New School for Public Engagement. April currently serves on the board of the Society of Professional Journalists Las Vegas pro chapter. A stickler about municipal boundary lines, April enjoys teaching people about unincorporated Clark County. She grew up in Sunrise Manor and currently resides in Paradise with her husband, two children and three mutts.