Selling hotel won’t let Trump off the hook, Titus says

Emoluments Palace
(Photo by Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images)
Emoluments Palace
(Photo by Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images)

The Trump organization’s Washington D.C. hotel, leased from property owned by the federal government, has been put on the market. But selling the property won’t rid the president of the constitutional questions that have dogged Trump and the property since before Trump’s inauguration, Nevada Rep. Dina Titus says.

“Donald Trump should’ve completely divested from his businesses before he became President,” said Titus, who chairs a subcommittee at the center of congressional investigations into Trump’s lease of the hotel.

“Instead, President Trump has made money from people looking to curry favor by booking hotel rooms and hosting private events,” Titus said. “The Founding Fathers put the Emoluments Clauses in the Constitution to prevent presidents from accepting bribes. Selling this hotel will not change the fact that President Trump has ignored the Constitution for nearly three years and he continues to encourage corruption in his own backyard.”

The news that the Trumps are looking to sell the hotel came a day after Titus and Transportation and Infrastructure Chair Peter DeFazio (D, OR) subpoenaed the General Services Administration for documents the administration has refused to produce relating to the hotel lease.

The hotel deal has also prompted emoluments lawsuits which are still going back and forth in the courts.

Hugh Jackson
Editor | Hugh Jackson has been writing about Nevada policy and politics for more than 20 years. He was editor of the Las Vegas Business Press, senior editor at the Las Vegas CityLife weekly newspaper, daily political commentator on the Las Vegas NBC affiliate, and wrote the then-groundbreaking Las Vegas Gleaner, which among other things was the only independent political blog from Nevada that was credentialed at the 2008 Democratic National Convention. He spent a few years as a senior energy and environmental policy analyst for Public Citizen, and has occasionally worked as a consultant on mining, taxation, education and other issues for Nevada labor and public interest organizations. His freelance work has been published in outlets ranging from the Guardian to Desert Companion to In These Times to the Oil & Gas Journal. For several years he also taught U.S. History courses at UNLV. Prior to moving to Las Vegas, he was a reporter and then assistant managing editor at the Casper Star-Tribune, Wyoming’s largest newspaper.