Undercurrent

Switch to electric vehicles could save billions of dollars and hundreds of lives in Nevada, says report

By: - March 30, 2022 2:07 pm

Nevada is one of 15 states that has embraced the stronger-than-national standards set by California regarding zero emission cars and light-duty trucks. But Nevada has not adopted similar zero emission standards for medium- and heavy-duty trucks.(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

A widespread transition to electric vehicles could save nearly 700 lives and $7.5 billion in public health spending in Nevada between 2020 and 2050, according to a new report by the American Lung Association.

The ALA report attempts to calculate the benefits of a national shift to 100% sale of zero-emission passenger cars and light-duty trucks by 2035 and 100% sale of zero-emission medium- and heavy duty trucks by 2040.

Nationally, that move to electric vehicles would generate $1.2 trillion in health benefits and $1.7 trillion in additional climate benefits over three decades, including avoiding 110,000 premature deaths, 3 million asthma attacks and more than 13 million workdays lost.

The report notes Nevada is one of 15 states that has embraced the stronger-than-national standards set by California regarding zero emission cars and light-duty trucks. But Nevada has not adopted similar zero emission standards for medium- and heavy-duty trucks. Only five other states — Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon and Washington — have, according to the ALA report.

A 2021 “State of the Air” report placed both the Las Vegas and Reno metropolitan areas on the top 25 cities most polluted by short-term particles.

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April Corbin Girnus
April Corbin Girnus

April Corbin Girnus is an award-winning journalist with a decade of media experience. She has been a beat writer at Las Vegas Sun, a staff writer at LEO Weekly, web editor of Las Vegas Weekly and a blogger documenting North American bike share systems’ efforts to increase ridership in underserved communities. An occasional adjunct journalism professor, April steadfastly rejects the notion that journalism is a worthless major. Amid the Great Recession, she earned a B.A. in journalism from the University of Nevada Las Vegas, where she served as editor-in-chief of the student newspaper. She later earned an M.A. in media studies and a graduate certificate in media management from The New School for Public Engagement. A stickler about municipal boundary lines, April enjoys teaching people about unincorporated Clark County. She grew up in Sunrise Manor and currently resides in Paradise with her husband, two children and two mutts.

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