Three Nevada names make list of nation’s 100 largest landowners

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moo.56 Paul Fireman

.68. Eugene Gabrych

.96 The Ellison family

Those are the Nevadans who made a list of the 100 largest private landowners in the U.S., according to a report from Bloomberg.

Fireman, the former Reebok CEO who now chairs a private equity firm, owns Winecup Gamble ranch in northeastern Nevada. Bloomberg’s report and accompanying interactive map, which was built in conjunction with data from the Land Report, does not specify acreage for each of the 100 top landowners. But the Winecup Gamble ranch (once owned by actor Jimmy Stewart) reportedly encompasses 247,500 acres.

Eugene Gabrych owns 200,000 acres in California and western Nevada, and describes himself as an investor, not a developer.

The Ellison family has amassed several holdings in northeastern Nevada over more than a century. One of Ellison Ranching Company’s spreads, the Spanish Ranch, reportedly encompass 76,000 acres.

The top 100 private landowners in total own about 40 million acres, or 2 percent of the land in the U.S., according to the Bloomberg report.

“It may not seem like much—all told, just about the size of Florida,” the report’s authors write. “But land is an often-overlooked repository of wealth, one of those quiet assets, such as artworks or trusts, that make up so much of the country’s unexamined riches as inequality widens.”

Hugh Jackson
Editor | Hugh Jackson has been writing about Nevada policy and politics for more than 20 years. He was editor of the Las Vegas Business Press, senior editor at the Las Vegas CityLife weekly newspaper, daily political commentator on the Las Vegas NBC affiliate, and wrote the then-groundbreaking Las Vegas Gleaner, which among other things was the only independent political blog from Nevada that was credentialed at the 2008 Democratic National Convention. He spent a few years as a senior energy and environmental policy analyst for Public Citizen, and has occasionally worked as a consultant on mining, taxation, education and other issues for Nevada labor and public interest organizations. His freelance work has been published in outlets ranging from the Guardian to Desert Companion to In These Times to the Oil & Gas Journal. For several years he also taught U.S. History courses at UNLV. Prior to moving to Las Vegas, he was a reporter and then assistant managing editor at the Casper Star-Tribune, Wyoming’s largest newspaper.

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